How Freedom Turned into Privilege - Encounter Books

Thank you for choosing to order from EncounterBooks.com. Due to increased demand, please allow extra time for your order to ship.

How Freedom Turned into Privilege

Timothy Sandefur Discusses The Permission Society with RealClearPolicy
By Timothy Sandefur | October 03, 2016

RealClearPolicy editor M. Anthony Mills and Timothy Sandefur sat to discuss Sandefur’s new book The Permission Society, and the implicit consequences of over-reaching government regulations.

A “permission society” is the opposite of a free society, where one has to get government pre-approval for just about anything they want to do, from purchasing a firearm to selling flowersSandefur explains:

About 800 years ago, the Magna Carta was issued, and if you look at it, it says that King John was giving the following freedom to his subjects. Our constitution says that we the people are giving the government these powers. Now we are saying that people are free and are giving our government these powers. That is exactly the reverse of the original permission society.

The problem is that now, in the early 20th century, intellectual leaders, lawyers, judges, law professors, and political philosophers reverse that trend, and started going back to the permission society model, arguing that freedom is a privilege the government gives to us—for example, like private property rights. The founding fathers thought of private property as an essential aspect of what it means to be human. You have the right to your body and the things you make with your body, including your wages. Nowadays, intellectual leaders tend to think of property as a space around the individual that the government creates. The government creates private property rights by not taking your stuff away. And essentially, the problem with that is that it loads the dice against freedom—it stifles innovation, it stifles discovery, it stifles opportunity, because now you have to go to government bureaucrats to get some form of permit, before you’re allowed to build a house, start a business, or have anything.

Watch the full interview here.

For more from Timothy Sandefur, read The Permission Society.

Author Thumbnail

Timothy Sandefur is Vice President for Litigation at the Goldwater Institute. Before joining Goldwater, he served 15 years as a litigator at the Pacific Legal Foundation, where he won important victories for economic liberty in several states.

Recent Articles By This Author

Previous Article
The McMinn County War
Next Article
Uncle Sam is the Worst Helicopter Parent in America