Naomi Schaefer Riley - Encounter Books

Naomi Schaefer Riley

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Naomi Schaefer Riley

NAOMI SCHAEFER RILEY is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, focusing on issues of child welfare, as well as a senior fellow at the Independent Women’s Forum. A former New York Post columnist and a former Wall Street Journal editor and writer, she is the author of several books on education, religion, and family.

Ms. Riley’s writings have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the LA Times, and the Washington Post, among other publications. She appears regularly on Fox News and Fox Business and CNBC. She has also appeared on Q&A with Brian Lamb as well as the Today Show.

She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University with degrees in English and government. She lives in the suburbs of New York City with her husband, Jason, and their three children.


Titles by this Author

  • Naomi Schaefer Riley

    If you want to know why American Indians have the highest rates of poverty of any racial group, why suicide is the leading cause of death among American Indian men, why American Indian women are raped at two and a half times the national average rate, and why gang violence affects American Indian youths more than any other group, do not look to history. There is no doubt that white settlers devastated Indian communities in the 19th and early 20th centuries. But it is our public policies today—which deny Indians ownership of their land, refuse them access to the free market, and fail to provide the police and legal protections due to them as American citizens—that have turned reservations into third-world countries in the middle of the richest and freest nation on Earth.

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    • $17.99
    • Available 11/30/2021
  • Naomi Schaefer Riley

    If you want to know why American Indians have the highest rates of poverty of any racial group, why suicide is the leading cause of death among Indian men, why native women are two and a half times more likely to be raped than the national average and why gang violence affects American Indian youth more than any other group, do not look to history.

    Read More

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